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How I’m hiring a Designer?

UX is a hard skill to teach; no formal certificate is required, and Neither two career path nor job descriptions are the same. In fact, fasten down exactly what UX can be difficult. It can mean different things to different people. Some UX design positions require only graphic design skills, others mainly planning and wireframing. Most, however, it requires a combination of design, planning, negotiation, conflict management, objectivity, leadership and openness. Above all, a good UX professional must have a natural gratitude of the human mind, be open to new attitudes and methods and to explore the impact of real people on the environment around them.
Recruiting or hiring or staffing UX professionals can be both fun and challenging. Actually, the “right” person will be entirely different from the person you initially expected, therefore skill and hunch are required to pick them out. One thing is for sure, though: UX skills are in high demand and short supply. It’s a Designer’s market, and companies need to try more than ever to fascinate and retain the best one’s in the field if they are to overcome online.

What Makes For A Great UX Designer?

1. If you don’t know what you are looking for, you will never know when you’ve found it. Nowhere this philosophy will be true than with hiring.
2. A real appreciation, not only of what makes a superb UX designer but of what kind of person you are looking for is essential if you are to recruit successfully.
3. What makes a UX designer great is, of course, a matter of opinion, but there is a consensus that a UX designer must, “Someone who can make the complex simple,ordinary beautiful ever so slightly fun.

There is a Question I Ask Every Candidate?

One thing that is cosmically agreed on is that there is no “correct” way to interview someone, so I ask this question to our experts to see if we could at least drawout a common themes. “Can you describe me a project that when it is terribly wrong. Why did it go wrong, and what did you personally learn from it?”

Have A Particular Method Of Assessing Candidates?

One thing that is cosmically agreed on is that there is no “correct” way to interview someone, so I ask this question to our experts to see if we could at least draw out common themes. “Can you describe me a project that when it is terribly wrong. Why did it go wrong, and what did you personally learn from it?”

How to perform Heuristic Evaluation?

Assessing a candidate’s suitability for a job is certainly one of the most, if not the most, challenging aspects of hiring, so understanding how the best in the business it is helpful? Some clearly like to go the practical route and judge a candidate by assigning them a task during or following the interview.
Allows a designer to do most of the talking and gives them simulations to perform, “such as, give a short presentation and send us the video. This can’t truly demonstrate how they would do, but it’s a start. Sometimes we agree with a candidate to first test the waters by hiring them on a contract basis or as an intern. If we are all happy and still interested in the end, we hire them.”

Hiring should be based On what? Experience or Portfolio

“Years of experience and portfolios are useful inputs and metrics, but we are more interested in a candidate’s answer to our questions and their response to the task that we set.”

Retain Talent

To someone outside of the UX community, talent retention might not seem like a critical issue, given that the state of the economy and how many people are looking for work. But UX is a fiercely competitive market, with agencies and consultancies vying for the attention of the right UX folks. The level of attention given to talent retention by the people I spoke with is fascinating. the above statements seems to be the key factors in retaining the best UX designers.